FAQs

FAQs

Q?

Where can I get some ideas?

A.

I've compiled lots of ideas on the Conventional/Unconventional/Downright Radical scale here:

Examples

Q?

How would you describe your personal style?

A.

Honestly, I'm not a minimalist at heart...those clutter-free interior design photos are beautiful but not livable for real life. However, I do not gravitate toward too much visual noise either.

Geometric, organic, natural, sustainable, clever, and creative are the main words I would use to describe my tendencies in design. But versatile is also an important word because, while I want to attract clients who really dig my spin on things, I also understand how important customization is for each particular client since everyone lives differently. I will always share my ideas, but the ability to listen is a huge component of being a successful and caring Architect.

I’m obviously attracted to wilderness and mountain homes, but incorporating nature as much as possible is so important, even for city dwellings. Treehouses, garden roofs, and many other ways of integrating nature are appealing to me. I hate to have to cut down trees to fit in a house! But when that is necessary, I will always attempt to provide a good view out to nature. That's where we find our grounding and so much of our peace of mind.

Q?

What’s the most unique design element you’ve used to-date?

A.

I once made a hidden library door! Who says homes shouldn't be playful and even a little mysterious if that's what the client wants? Most people, I think, have childhood fantasies of secret rooms and hidden passageways. Think Coraline and Narnia.

Having said that, I believe even the coolest homes should be low-maintenance, so I try to picture myself living there to see how it would feel. I always consider things like: How would I dust something? How would I keep a slanted wall clean?! Those things are important to think about because a real human being with a real life will be living in the home. It has to work for them functionally, as well as aesthetically.

Q?

Can I remodel my home in stages?

A.

Yes! If it works better for you to have the transformation completed in phases rather than all at once, we can of course work that out.

Q?

What is it like when you’re designing?

A.

When I truly lose myself in the design process, I lose all sense of time. It feels like the design is being channeled through me, as if I'm just the conduit for the design. I find so much joy in seeing something beautiful and workable taking shape (especially when it’s something that will give others joy too)!

Q?

What would you love to do more of?

A.

So many things! I would love to invent a new type of dwelling or at least a new way of doing an existing one. I also dream of finding a creative solution for low-cost housing.

Someday, maybe I can do a shipping container house. I could see either celebrating the container in its pure form or using one or more containers as a starting point (for their structural integrity) and then “covering them up.” I could also see using one or more containers as accents or foils to some other kind of form.

I’d love to do more highly “geometric” designs. Another form of Organic Architecture I’d like to do more of is free-form sculptural homes, or at least, parts of homes.

I don’t want to do any one single type of dwelling only. I’m interested in doing a wide range of types, with being unconventional as one of the common themes. Earthy with a touch of modernity can be just as fun as slick and spaceship-like. Frankly, this variety keeps me from getting bored in my work and prevents my creativity from stagnating by constantly affording me with exciting challenges!

Many clients are asking for mid-century modern too, a style I also enjoy. About a year ago, I designed one that more or less qualifies, although it hasn’t been built yet.

I just want to make truly special homes for my clients, whatever form they might take.

Q?

Did you design your own home?

A.

I did!

The original idea behind the design was a geodesic dome incorporating five abstracted women’s faces. However, the bank said they couldn’t find any comparables, so they didn’t know how much money it would be safe to lend for the project! Sadly, this caused the design to change quite a bit. If I were doing it now, I’d improve the design quite a bit. For example, instead of having the “hair” going straight down, then back, I’d have it pulled it back a bit, going diagonally down right away. I’d also make the faces more literal and more attractive.

Here are the original plans and 3D models:

geodesic blueline - Caroline's house

Dome - Cupola & Deck

And here is what actually got built (thanks a lot, bank, for not thinking outside the box! So, as you can see: Box it is!):

Caroline Boyd's home

I didn’t have any more trees cut down than were absolutely necessary, so this city home that’s only 30 feet from the curb can hardly be seen in the summertime due to the dense vegetation. I had to photograph it in the early spring to be able to show the house!